Recent Notices of Ottawa Centre CMOS Meetings

Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 21 April 2022
 

Speaker:  Dr. Ellen Field, Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University

Title:  Role of Education in Climate Action: Research-Informed Engagement

Abstract:  

In this talk, Dr. Ellen Field will discuss how education is, and, has been an overlooked mitigation strategy and how education policy can be instrumental as part of a multi-pronged approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Gaps in current education policy at Canadian regional jurisdictions (provincial and territorial) and national levels will be discussed along with best practices of climate change education from empirical research studies. In addition, this talk will consider lessons the formal education system can learn from the youth climate justice movement, and possible pathways for responsive education systems that focus on transformative and transgressive pedagogies. Audience members will take away insights on how education is instrumental to climate action and suggested ways to engage various segments of the population in climate change education.

BIO:


Ellen Field is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University. Her research is focused on policy and practice of climate change education in formal and higher education systems. Ellen teaches Environmental Education (B.Ed) and Climate Change Education (M.Ed) in the Faculty of Education, and has engaged hundreds of teachers in professional development workshops in the last several years. Ellen is an Associate Editor of the Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, co-chair of the Canadian Regional Hub of Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Change Education (MECCE), and moderates a professional learning community called Climate Change Education Canada with over 1000 teachers.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday, 21 April 2022, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.

NEXT MEETINGS

CMOS Congress - virtual from Saskatoon, 1-3 and 6-8 June 2022

Ottawa Centre - September 2022



CMOS Tour Speaker - 17 March 2022

Speaker :  Dr. Eric Oliver

Title: 
Bridging knowledge systems: Scientific and Inuit knowledge of the ocean and sea ice

BIO:

Dr. Eric Oliver is an Assistant Professor of Physical Oceanography in the Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. His research interests involve ocean and climate variability across a range of time and space scales including extreme events, the predictability of climate variations, the influence of modes of variability on the ocean, and the role of climate change on the mean state, variability and extremes of the climate system. He is of Inuit descent with roots in Nunatsiavut (northern Labrador) and is interested in Indigenous perspectives on climate, weather and oceans and understanding both Indigenous and scientific knowledge of these systems.

 

Abstract :   Science and Inuit both have ways of knowing with a rich understanding of climate, the ocean and sea ice. These understandings are distinct and independent, yet complementary. Is it possible to bridge these two knowledge systems so as to inform each from the other? Is it even desirable? As a Labrador Inuk working in the scientific field of oceanography I have spent the four years exploring these questions. While they cannot be answered simply, I will provide my perspective and experience working at the interface between scientific and Inuit knowledge of the ocean. My research team and collaborators in the Nunatsiavut Government and in Inuit communities in the region, have been undertaking a number of related project and activities along these lines. Inuit knowledge of the coastal ocean and sea ice is being documented using participatory mapping and interview methods. We are developing ways recording Inuit observations of the environment, rooted in and referencing local traditional knowledge and focusing on that which Inuit consider important and of value. Scientific measurements of coastal ocean temperature, salinity, and ocean currents are being made through community-based monitoring programmes with representation in most communities in Nunatsiavut who are providing their expertise in choosing locations, times, and methods of accessing field sites. Finally, we are developing numerical ocean models for the region with Inuit Knowledge providing both ground-truths against which we can validate the model as well as informing hypothesis and model experiments. We have also been exploring the role that land-based activities, including research workshops, can play in this process. We are encouraged by the points of contact between science and Inuit knowledge that have emerged – such as maps, conceptual models, hypotheses – and that these can play the role of boundary objects to facilitate dialogue between these two knowledge systems.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 17 February 2022

Speaker:  Elyn Humphreys, Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies at Carleton University

Title:  Methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands 

Abstract:  The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is the largest contiguous peatland complex in North America. Although peatlands are large stores of carbon, they are a natural source of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. However, it remains uncertain how much CH4 is emitted by the HBL peatlands and how ongoing climate change will impact these emissions.

We measured CH4 fluxes using the eddy covariance technique at four HBL peatland sites with different vegetation and peat characteristics over several years. Total seasonal emissions ranged from 2.6 to 7.2 g CH4 m-2 (Apr 1 – Nov 30) with the highest values at the wettest and warmest peatland, a patterned fen, and the lowest at the driest and coolest peatland, a raised peat plateau with permafrost. Year-to-year variability in CH4 emissions was less than site-to-site variability.  These measurements can help constrain recent top-down estimates of HBL-wide CH4 budgets.  We also discuss how these measurements can help us understand the potential impacts of warming, drying and thaw on HBL CH4 emissions.

BIO:
 

Elyn Humphreys is a Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies at Carleton University.  She leads the CUBiomet research group focused on measuring and modeling surface-atmosphere interactions of northern terrestrial ecosystems. Her group aims to improve our understanding of the impacts climate change and other disturbances have on the energy and carbon budgets of these ecosystems and their role in feedback processes within the climate system.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday, 17 February 2022, 11:45 AM, EST

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings

NEXT MEETINGS

Thursday 17 March 2022 - Eric Oliver Experiences bridging knowledge systems (ocean science and Inuit Knowledge) in coastal Nunatsiavut. (NB. talk to be hosted jointly by the Ottawa and Halifax Centres)

Thursday 21 April 2022 - Ellen Field Role of Education in Climate Action: Research-informed engagement
.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 20 January 2022
 

Speakers:  Trevor Andersen and Astrid Schetselaar

Titles:

Trevor Andersen:  Synoptic conditions leading to storm force winds in Hurricane Alley, km 450-465, Dempster Highway, Yukon

Astrid Schetselaar:  Increases in maintenance costs for highways due to climate change in Yukon

Abstracts: 

Trevor Andersen
The final 15 kilometres of the Dempster Highway within the Yukon (YT km 450-465) – known as Hurricane Alley – experience strong downslope winter windstorms. Easterly winds blow perpendicularly across the highway after topographic enhancement by a north-south ridge east of the road. The ECCC Rock River meteorological station recorded 88 hours of sustained wind speeds above 75 km/h during winter 2020/21. The windstorms frequently cause road closures and hazardous conditions for motorists. ECCC wind forecasts are often inaccurate since the modelled grid cells are much larger than the ridge; however, recent UBC modelling suggested that using smaller grid cells should increase accuracy. In October 2021, seven additional local meteorological stations were installed to measure winds. This talk will discuss the state of the research on Hurricane Alley windstorms, and the use of synoptic tools (ECCC analysis charts and NOAA HYSPLIT model results) to explain atmospheric conditions responsible for the windstorms.

Astrid Schletselaar:  Climate warming is causing rapid and widespread environmental change in northern regions. Transportation networks in Canada’s North are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Rising ground temperatures and permafrost thaw have been a main cause of road damage as the bearing capacity of the ground is significantly reduced and subsequently subsides, leading to differential settlement of the road surface. Other road damage is due to increased precipitation which causes road washouts, icings, damage of culverts and landslides. Under current climate trends, it is expected that highway infrastructure in northern communities will require increased maintenance, incurring significant costs, in order to meet functional standards.

This presentation will outline a quantified assessment of climate change-induced maintenance expenditures for highways in Yukon. Changes in expenditures linked to climate conditions will be discussed in relation to underlying permafrost and ground ice conditions.

BIOs:

Trevor Andersen grew up in Ottawa ON and completed his B.Sc. in Physical Geography at Carleton University in April of 2020. He is currently completing his M.Sc. in Geography at Carleton University under the supervision of Dr. Chris Burn and Dr. Ian McKendry (UBC). His interest in meteorology originated from experiencing Hurricane Charley while on vacation in Florida during August 2004. Trevor’s introduction to the windstorms of Hurricane Alley occurred while assisting another Masters student with her research there.



Astrid Schetselaar
is a M.Sc. candidate in Geography at Carleton University, under the supervision of Dr. Chris Burn. Her research interests include the effects of climate change on northern transportation systems in permafrost regions and the consequent social, economic, and cultural outcomes of these effects. As well, her interests are in translating scientific investigations of the impacts of climate change to policy for the development of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. Previously, Astrid completed a B.Sc. in environmental science at the University of Ottawa with a specialization in global change.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday, 20 January 2022, 11:45 AM, EST

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 18 November 2021
 

Speaker:  Stephan Gruber, Professor, Carleton University

Title:  Toward Permafrost Climate Services 

Abstract:  The Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC) revealed the benefits of ambitious mitigation and effective adaptation and, conversely, the escalating costs and risks of delayed action. But how do we best enable this effective adaptation and ambitious mitigation when it comes to permafrost thaw? In this presentation, I will explore the potential role of operational services. With the framing of climate services, several distinct challenges can be identified for permafrost climate services: (1) history – climate services evolved from e.g., National Weather Services, whereas permafrost services are rarely established, (2) perception – permafrost areas are in the periphery and hazards affect relatively few people directly, and (3) processes and paradigms – a new combination of research and capabilities related to the atmosphere and the subsurface are needed to generate future scenarios of permafrost thaw. Emerging permafrost climate services and initiatives will be discussed to illustrate the growing momentum that exists in Canada, for example NSERC PermafrostNet, and globally.

BIO:  Stephan Gruber


Stephan is a Professor at Carleton University and the Canada Research Chair in Climate Change Impacts/Adaptation in Northern Canada. Previously, he worked at the University of Zurich (Switzerland) and the Université de Savoie (France). His education is in Physical Geography (Germany, Switzerland), Environmental Systems Analysis and Monitoring (the Netherlands), and Arctic Studies (Finland). Stephan's research program quantifies permafrost thaw in Arctic and high-mountain environments.

· PermafrostNet (NSERC Permafrost Partnership Network for Canada), scientific director, since 2019
· IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate, lead author and member of drafting team for the Summary for Policymakers, 2017–2019
· Hindu Kush Himalayan Monitoring and Assessment Program, lead author, 2016–2018
· Co-editor-in-chief of The Cryosphere, 2010–2017
· Contributor to Swiss Permafrost Monitoring Network PERMOS, 2004–2013

NEXT MEETINGS


Thursday 20 January 2022 - Trevor Andersen and Astrid Schetselaar

- Trevor Andersen: Storm force winds in Hurricane Alley, KM 450-465, Dempster Highway, Yukon

- Astrid Schetselaar: Increases in maintenance costs for highways due to climate change in Yukon

Thursday 17 February 2022 - Dr. Elyn Humphreys  Peatland / tundra methane flux studies

Thursday 17 March 2022 - Eric Oliver Experiences bridging knowledge systems (ocean science and Inuit Knowledge) in coastal Nunatsiavut. (NB. talk to be hosted jointly by the Ottawa and Halifax Centres)

Thursday 21 April 2022 - Ellen Field Role of Education in Climate Action: Research-informed engagement



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 21 October 2021
 

Speakers:  Dr. Alan Betts, Atmospheric Research, Pittsford, Vermont 

Title:  Climate Change and Society

Abstract:  This talk will be based upon this recent paper which I suggest you scan.

"Climate Change and Society" DOI: 10.3934/geosci. 2021012 

This examines our understanding of climate change, as well as the reluctance of industrial societies to deal with the drivers, especially the burning of the fossil fuels, before the consequences become catastrophic.  I have worked as a professional scientist for 50 years, but I also realized 50 years ago that science alone is not enough to deal with pressing global issues, as it lacks a moral framework—it lacks wisdom.  So I decided it was also my responsibility as a scientist to develop the skills to map out what drives the social framework and the social assumptions.  I contrast the Earth-centered indigenous worldview needed for our survival (which has been systematically destroyed), with the industrial capitalist mindset of the Fossil fuel Empire that is destroying our stable climate to maximize profits.  We review briefly the long history of the misuse of human power, and the rise of science and technology without a guiding moral framework.  But the deceit and bribery of politicians by the Fossil Empire are no match for the Earth system response. We are seeing new climate extremes on a global scale that are destroying our fossil fuel and economic infrastructure in an attempt to save some of the Earth’s ecosystem.

BIO:  



Dr. Alan Betts of Atmospheric Research in Pittsford, Vermont is a climate scientist, who has worked on climate change planning for Vermont. He is a Weekly Planet columnist for the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times-Argus, and before COVID he was a frequent speaker on climate change issues around the state. You can hear and see his radio and TV appearances on his web-site: https://alanbetts.com/talks

He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Royal Meteorological Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a past-president of the Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering (VASE). He has authored more than 175 reviewed papers in the scientific literature. He was the AMS Robert E. Horton Lecturer in Hydrology in 2004; and the AMS Jule Charney Award winner in 2007. In 2016, Alan Betts was the first recipient of the Bert Bolin Global Environmental Change Award from the American Geophysical Union.

Atmospheric Research was established in Vermont in 1979. Its mission is to understand the Earth’s weather and climate, to develop improved earth system models and to help society understand the existential challenge of global climate change.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME21 October 2021, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.

NEXT MEETING: Thursday November 18th, speaker Dr. Stephan Gruber on Permafrost Climate Services as a way to frame the research in NSERC PermafrostNet



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 23 September 2021
 

Speakers:  Barbara Delisle and Peter Kimbell from Meteorological Service of Canada

Title:  Canadian Weather Radar - Public Display Update and Plans for Upgrading Franktown Site

Abstract:  In 2017, the Government of Canada announced the replacement of its weather radar network. At the time, the network consisted of 31 radars, including two operated in partnership with the Department of National Defence and one owned by McGill University. A contract was awarded to buy and install 32 to 33 new radars. They are S-band (10 cm) radars, and utilize dual-polarization technology. One of the radars is located in Franktown, in eastern Ontario, and was just commissioned (August 2021). The presentation will provide an overview of the network, the new technology, and the resulting improvement in our ability to forecast the weather in eastern Ontario.  The website www.weather.gc.ca  is getting a makeover that will allow you to view more weather products and services. You probably noticed on March 29 that the RADAR product changed on your favorite weather website! This was a first step towards transforming the site, which now offers products and services geo-referenced on a single map of Canada. As with every transformation, a lot of reactions and adjustments were necessary. We will be happy to provide you with an overview of the changes and improvements available now and in the future. 

BIOs:

BARBARA DELISLE

Senior Manager, Dissemination Systems, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Federal public servant for 20 years, Barbara Delisle has acquired a diversified experience in the management of programs and services, in particular as the manager responsible for human resources compliance at the Communications Security Establishment, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Office of the Languages Commissioner. She then developed an information management and automated planning system for 26 research units at Employment and Social Development Canada, before joining the Benefits Directorate at the Treasury Board Secretariat, where she orchestrated the overhaul of business and project management processes. Barbara joined the Meteorological Service of Canada in March 2014. With her team of experts and technicians, she leads the way in maintaining operations on our broadcasting platforms and hardware and software transformations to improve and extend our services to the population. Through various internal and external partnerships with the organization, programmers, scientists and service agents, she made possible the transformation of voice systems, various website transitions and improvements to the mobile application. A change agent and vision maker, she proudly shares advancements in MSC IT service delivery.

****

PETER KIMBELL

Warning Preparedness Meteorologist, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Peter has been a meteorologist with Environment Canada for over 30 years. He began as an operational forecaster in Montreal and Toronto, and since then has worked as far east as Halifax and as far west as Thunder Bay. He has experience doing forecasting for marine and aviation clients, the military, and the general public. Since 2004 Peter has worked in a variety of non-forecasting positions, including policy advisor for international affairs, NAV CANADA Account Manager, A/Chief Aviation and Defence Services, A/Manager Performance Measurement, A/Manager Central Region Services, and A/Manager of the Ontario Storm Prediction Centre. His substantive position (and the one he likes most) is that of Warning Preparedness Meteorologist for eastern Ontario. Peter holds B. Sc. and M. Sc. degrees in meteorology from McGill University. 

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME23 September 2021, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.

NEXT MEETING:  Thursday October 21, speaker Dr. Alan Betts, on "Science and Society Challenges".



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / Thursday 29 April 2021
 
Speaker:   Laura Twidle, Managing Director, Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ)

Title:  The Impacts of Extreme Events on the Canadian Insurance Industry  

Abstract:  While a global pandemic paused many aspects of our lives in 2020, extreme weather events gave us no reprieve. Natural and man-made disasters, known as “catastrophes,” in the insurance industry, broke global records around the world last year, and Canada was no exception. Insured losses in Canada from catastrophic events in 2020 were nearly CAN $2.4 billion, continuing the past decade’s trend of increasing annual losses.

Identifying and preparing for the concerns of the more frequent, more severe extreme weather events anticipated by climate change is key to reducing impacts on Canadians. Insured loss data in combination with climate data and mitigation techniques can provide decision makers with the necessary information to act.

This presentation will provide an analysis of the meteorological factors at work in natural catastrophes and the geographical distribution of Canada’s NatCATs, with emphasis on 2020, using data collected by CatIQ, Canada’s insured loss and exposure indices provider. Analysis will include a close look at 2020 insured loss data and how it compares to the Canadian catastrophe loss database.

BIO:  Laura Twidle