Recent Notices of Ottawa Centre CMOS Meetings


Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 18 April 2024
  
Speaker:  Joanna Dean, Associate Professor, History, Carleton University

TitleTeaching climate as a historian
 
Abstract:  Until recently, the climate crisis has been the domain of science and scientists. Now humanities scholars are stepping up.  New interdisciplinary courses, centres, journals and programs are appearing.  Joanna Dean has been teaching climate history for many years, initially as a component of an environmental history course and now as a core course in Carleton University’s new minor in Environmental and Climate Humanities.  She will argue that the humanities do more than improve communication about climate, they further our understanding of the ways we frame narratives and interpret data. She will also reflect on how teaching climate has broadened her thinking as a historian to encompass deep time and imagined futures.
 
Biography:

Joanna Dean is an associate professor at Carleton University where she teaches environmental history, climate history and animal history.  In 2023 she convened a series of lectures by leading historians on climate. She has published widely on the history of street trees and urban woodlands, and she is currently working on an environmental history of lovers walk on the parliamentary slopes. 

Location Virtual presentation via Zoom.

Time:  Thursday 18 April 2024, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 21 March 2024
  
Speaker:  Yan Boulanger, Research scientist, Forest Ecology, Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada

TitleWhat the Future Holds for Wildfires in a Future Climate
  
Abstract:  Wildfires are one of the most important natural disturbances in Canada. Anthropogenic climate change is significantly impacting fire regimes across the country. Increasing temperatures, more severe and prolonged drought conditions, and the lengthening of the fire season makes the vegetation drier and much more flammable while causing fire prone weather conditions to be more severe and more frequent. The consequences of these changing fire regimes are numerous, affecting the several aspects of the socio-ecological realm. Adaptation is needed as we will need to learn to live in world where fire is much more prevalent. 
 
Biography:

Yan Boulanger holds a Ph.D. in Biology from the Université du Québec à Rimouski. Between 2010 and 2013, he was a postdoctoral fellow under the supervision of Dr. Sylvie Gauthier and Phil Burton at the Laurentian Forestry Centre where he worked to define homogeneous fire regime zones in Canada. Since then, he has been a researcher in forest ecology. His research interests include 1) the projection of natural disturbance regimes in Canada (mainly fire and spruce budworm) in relation to climate change, 2) the projection of forest landscapes and wildlife habitats, and 3) the dynamics of spruce budworm dispersal using weather radar. Dr. Boulanger is an associate professor at the Université du Québec à Rimouski, at Laval University and at the Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue.

Location Virtual presentation via Zoom.

Time:  Thursday 21 March 2024, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.




Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 22 February 2024
  
Speaker:  Michel Jean, President Infrastructure Commission, World Meteorological Organization; Emeritus associate, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Title:  The Global Meteorological and Environmental Enterprise in the Era of Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence: Implications for Canada
 
Summary:  The world of meteorology and climate was one of the first examples of massive data generators, as well as being a major driver of innovation in the development of high-performance computers. Already in the 1970s-1980s-1990s, the application of statistical methods (in the post-processing of output from numerical weather prediction models), the ancestors of machine learning approaches (analog, perfect prog, MOS, UMOS, etc.), were being used with the massive data of the time. The last two decades have seen an explosion in the volume, accessibility and diversity of data, and improved accessibility to low-cost, high-performance computing systems, leading to an acceleration in machine learning applications and more sophisticated artificial intelligence techniques.  
The World Meteorological Organization, through its member countries, plays a leading role in the development and use of these technologies. The presentation will provide a brief background on the current structure of the WMO, a portrait of the atmospheric and climate sciences 'playground', a reflection on the aspects associated with massive data, and a consideration of the global infrastructures required. Examples and reflections on the implications for Canada will be shared.
 
Biography:

Mr. Michel Jean graduated from the Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) in Physics in 1982 and obtained his Masters degree in Meteorology from McGill University in 1987. After being an operational meteorologist, he has managed regional and national atmospheric and climate science programs, field operations in the area of weather prediction and atmospheric and hydrometric monitoring and the development of national weather and environmental prediction systems. He led the Canadian Centre for Meteorological and Environmental Prediction and has been responsible of the long term High Performance Computing strategy and the next generation integrated forecaster workstation project. 

Mr Jean has been involved with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for the past 30 years. He has been elected President of the WMO Commission for Basic Systems in November 2016 and elected President of WMO's newly established Infrastructure Commission in June 2019.

Mr. Jean is the recipient of many prizes and recognitions within the Public Service of Canada and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society for outstanding contributions to the operationalization of meteorological science, advancement in environmental applications of numerical weather predictions and for exemplary work in representing Canada on the world stage. He retired from the Canadian Public Service in January 2021 and has been granted an Emeritus Associate status with Environment and Climate Change Canada. In September 2022 he has accepted the chairmanship of the Scientific Committee of the Ouranos Consortium, a Consortium providing regional climate change adaptation strategies and climate services.

Location Virtual presentation via Zoom.

Time:  Thursday 22 February 2024, 11:45 AM, EST

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 11 January 2024
  
Speaker:  Gilbert Brunet, Chief Scientist at the Bureau of Meteorology, Australia 

Title:  Addressing Earth's Foremost Challenges: Advancing Meteorological and Climate Solutions.
 
Abstract:  Extreme weather events are causing unprecedented floods, droughts, fires, and ecosystem damage on all scales. This necessitates better early warnings, climate, weather services, especially for transitioning to carbon-neutral economies. These challenges demand faster innovation, technological advancements, and stronger interdisciplinary collaboration, with a significant role for the private sector. The UN's Early Warnings for All aims to establish crucial early warning systems by 2027. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has outlined eight recommendations for its future research and service development, especially for poorer nations. The top long term recommendation emphasizes the need for high-resolution climate models to depict localized weather changes. Harnessing digital technologies like Exascale computing and Machine Learning will be essential for this. Global collaboration and adequate training are crucial to maximize local benefits from global science. The WMO is expected to boost scientific partnerships to deliver detailed global climate data. Investments should prioritize areas that offer the most societal benefits, and this involves leveraging digital strategies, quality assurance, and broadening educational efforts.
 

 

Gilbert Brunet has been the Chief Scientist at the Bureau of Meteorology, Australia since 2018 and the Chair of the World Meteorological Organization's Scientific Advisory Panel since 2020. He earned his PhD in meteorology from McGill University in 1989. His career milestones include leadership roles at the Meteorological Research Division, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and the UK's Met Office. He directed significant Earth-system weather and climate prediction programs in Canada, the UK, and Australia.

Since 2018, he's chaired the UK Met Office Scientific Advisory Committee and was awarded notable distinctions such as the 2010 Patterson Distinguished Service Medal and becoming a Fellow of the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanic Society in 2018.
 
Scientifically, he is recognized for his expertise in weather and climate dynamics, with a research background spanning renowned institutions such as Cambridge University and École Normale Supérieure, Paris. His work focuses on wave processes and numerical weather prediction across various scales.

Location Virtual presentation via Zoom.

Time:  Thursday 11 January 2024, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 


Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 21 November 2023

 
Speaker:  Craig McLean, Captain NOAA (Retired) J. D., Retired Acting Chief Scientist, and Assistant Administrator for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research of NOAA.

Title:  Progress, Challenges and Opportunities from the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021-2030)

Summary:   With our planet being covered by 70% water,  the non-political nature and shear expanse of the world's ocean makes science coordination efforts enormous.  Priorities amongst governments are often not aligned to ocean and marine life beyond the coastal shelves, and efforts to align domestic political interests with those of the international communities are challenging. The ocean and marine life are key building blocks to life as we know it on our planet and many countries look to the ocean for food, security, transportation, energy, and more. While the ocean and the very ecosystems it houses are under great stress, many nations are looking to the oceans for expanding their prosperity and optimizing potential benefits from the emerging emphasis on the blue economy.  All these actions should be based on sound science - understanding the importance of ocean system resilience, sustainability and responsible development.  The UN, under the leadership of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Committee of UNESCO laid out ambitions to improve the state of our understanding through the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development. This talk will draw out some of these key elements, including the challenges and opportunities that the Decade on Ocean Science will offer.

BIO:
 
 

Mr. McLean served NOAA in uniform for about 25 years and another 15 years in the Senior Executive Service at NOAA. He was the founding director of the Ocean Exploration program, an early architect of the UN Decade of Ocean Science, an ocean diplomat, lawyer, and ship captain during his career. He was very unique in his selection to head research in NOAA, chosen for his operational, management and leadership experience, holding a J. D. Retiring from NOAA in 2022, he is currently serving as a senior policy advisor for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and other ocean and climate bodies.

LOCATION :  Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Tuesday 21 November 2023, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 


Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 19 October 2023
  
Speaker:  Dr. David Sills, Executive Director – Northern Tornadoes Project

Title:  The Northern Tornadoes Project: What We’ve Learned About Tornadoes, Downbursts and Derechos in Canada

Abstract:  The Northern Tornadoes Project (NTP) began in 2017 as a partnership between Western Engineering and ImpactWX aiming to better detect tornado occurrence, improve severe and extreme weather prediction, mitigate against harm to people and property, and investigate future implications of climate change. Over the course of the project to date, we’ve uncovered Canada’s largest tornado outbreak, thoroughly documented high-impact tornado and downburst events including Canada’s first billion dollar derecho, and improved the understanding of where the country’s tornadoes occur and when – with a few surprises. At the same time, we’ve advanced the tools and techniques required to detect tornado and downburst events, particularly across large areas of the country with low population density. Our ambitious plans for where we go next will also be discussed.

BIO:

Dr. David Sills earned his Ph.D. degree in Atmospheric Science from York University in Toronto in 1998. He served as a Severe Weather Scientist at Environment Canada for more than 20 years before becoming the Executive Director of the Northern Tornadoes Project with Western Engineering in 2019. 
Dr. Sills is also an adjunct professor at both Western University and the University of Manitoba, and a principal investigator with the new Northern Hail Project. He has led or co-authored 45 journal publications and 36 conference papers, and has served as Associate Editor for the Canadian journal Atmosphere-Ocean and the American journal Monthly Weather Review.

In 2017, Dr. Sills was awarded the Rube Hornstein Medal for his contributions to operational meteorology in Canada.

He currently serves on the ASCE committee developing a new Enhanced Fujita Scale standard, and recently completed a 4-year term on the Nowcasting and Mesoscale Research Working Group of the UN World Meteorological Organization.

LOCATION Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday 19 October 2023, 11:45 AM, EDT
RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. 



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 20 April 2023

 
Speaker:  Yifeng Wang, PhD Candidate in the Department of Geography and Planning, Queen’s University

Title:  Revisiting the distribution of peatland permafrost in coastal Labrador

Abstract:  Northern peatlands cover about 4 million km2, and half of these peatlands are estimated to contain permafrost and periglacial landforms, such as palsas and peat plateaus. In Labrador, northeastern Canada, peatland permafrost landforms are largely predicted to be present in the interior and absent along the coastline. However, few observations of these landforms in the interior, coupled with extensive use of coastal perennially frozen peatlands for traditional activities by Labrador Inuit and Innu suggests a need for further investigations. In 2020, the Northern Environmental Geoscience Laboratory began a new research program to better understand the distribution, characteristics, and sensitivity of peatland permafrost in coastal Labrador using a combination of research methods including remote sensing, machine learning, field investigations, and thermal modelling.

The first stage of this project involved the development of a consensus-based inventory of prospective peatland permafrost complexes using high-resolution satellite imagery. The inventory, which identified over 1000 likely peatland permafrost complexes within 100 km of the Labrador Sea coastline, has been validated with extensive field visits and low-altitude aerial photography and videography. A coastal gradient for palsa and peat plateau distribution was identified and is thought to be attributed to a combination of climatic and geomorphological influences. Other initiatives as part of this overarching project include historical air photo analysis to identify the scale of thaw at selected complexes over the past 70 years and characterization of contemporary peatland permafrost landform heights, sizes, and associated snow and vegetation conditions at selected complexes along the coast using remotely piloted aircraft surveys. This work provides an important baseline for future mapping, modelling, and climate change adaptation strategy development in northeastern Canada.

BIO:


   

Yifeng Wang has been working in the North for several years, with a focus on permafrost studies in Labrador, northeastern Canada. Her research is currently focused on investigating the distribution and sensitivity of peatland permafrost in coastal Labrador. Yifeng is a member of the Northern Environmental Geoscience Laboratory (NEGL), led by Dr. Robert Way, and is interested in understanding how climate and ecosystem change will impact northern systems, environments, and communities.

LOCATION :  Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday 20 April 2023, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 23 March 2023

 
Speaker:  Igor Shkvorets, RBR Ltd.

Title:  Sail for Science - How Small Craft Can Fill Gaps In Global Coastal Ocean Observations

Abstract:  The world ocean is the global thermodynamic engine of weather and climate; without ocean data collection on a global scale, it is impossible to define problems of climate change.

Modern oceanographic data collection technologies include four thousand autonomous Argo floats, deployed globally in all oceans.  These profile every 10 days from a depth of 2000m to the surface to collect temperature, salinity and other physical-chemical data.  The rest of the time the floats drift while parked at a depth of 1000m.  This depth limits the areas of use of Argo floats in coastal waters where, when reaching shallow water, their mission is usually terminated. The cohort of Argo floats may be complemented by a flotilla of small craft.  To help fill this gap in oceanographic data, the author co-founded a non-for-profit project "Sail for Science" www.sailforscience.com, with the following objectives:  

1.  To collect low-cost high-quality oceanographic data using  RBR Ltd. (Ottawa, Canada) compact, reliable, easy operating CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) systems; and
2. To develop a methodology and best practice recommendations for citizen scientists on how to use RBR CTD systems to collect data, provide Quality Control of data, and transfer these data to the National Oceanographic Data Centres.

The presentation demonstrates how modern measurement technologies make it possible to expand citizen science to the new level of collecting high-precision oceanographic data.

BIO:



Igor Shkvorets is a Calibration Engineer/Oceanographer at RBR Ltd (Canada, Ottawa).  He was trained at Odessa Hydrometeorological Institute (Ukraine).  He has worked for 20 years in the Marine Hydrophysical Institute of Academy of Science of Ukraine in the Department of Metrology and has been working for 20 years at RBR Ltd, taking part in development and calibration of RBR CTD systems, and has participated in numerous scientific cruises.  He also maintains an informative website www.salinometry.com dedicated to the methods of measurement of seawater salinity,

LOCATION :  Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday 23 March 2023, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 23 February 2023

Speaker:  Dr. Shiliang (Dan) Shan, Assistant Professor, Department of Physics and Space Science, Royal Military College of Canada

Title:  Wind-driven Coastal Upwelling off Nova Scotia

Abstract:   Coastal upwelling is a prominent oceanic process that brings nutrient-rich deep waters to the sunlit surface, thereby regulating many productive fisheries and marine ecosystems around the globe. How the frequency, intensity, and duration of coastal upwelling might shift in a warming climate is therefore a question of vital importance.

In the first part of my presentation, I will discuss the temporal and spatial characteristics of the major wind-driven summertime coastal upwelling events off Nova Scotia.  In the second part, I will examine trends in coastal upwelling off Nova Scotia over the past two decades based on observations made from various platforms, including marine buoys, remote-sensing satellites, and autonomous underwater gliders.

A series of novel upwelling metrics are derived to describe coastal upwelling trends in terms of frequency, intensity, and duration. The predictability of observed upwelling trends is also explored by assessing the performance of coastal operational model products.


BIO:



Shiliang (Dan) Shan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and Space Science, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, ON, Canada. He is a physical oceanographer who specializes in numerical predictions of coastal and shelf circulations. He received the Ph.D. degree in physical oceanography from Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada in 2016. He was an NSERC Postdoctoral Visiting Fellow with the Fisheries and Oceans Canada from 2017 to 2018.

His research programme focuses on the understanding and modelling of the hydrodynamics of fjords, continental shelves, and inland lakes. His current research activities cover several aquatic environments across Canada, including the Halifax Harbour on the East Coast, Kitimat Fjord on the West Coast, the Pangnirtung Fjord on the Arctic Coast, and the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario of the Great Lakes.

LOCATION :  Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday 23 February 2023, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.




Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 25 November 2022

 
Speaker:  Professor Parisa A. Ariya, Department of Chemistry and Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada

Title:  Nano-and microparticles in the era of Climate Change and COVID-19: Novel observation technologies, transformations, and sustainable remediation

Abstract:  Particles, nano, micro and macro-particles, are ubiquitous on Earth. They are chemically, physically, and biologically diverse. They are naturally produced or increasingly through numerous anthropogenic activities, namely medicine-health, chemical industries, materials, construction, transport, communication, aerospace, agriculture, and energy sectors.  Air pollution, particularly airborne nano-size particles, have been identified as the cause of about 6 million premature deaths (WHO, 2020).  Aerosols are also significant in climate change and Earth’s energy processes. They play a role in radiation, ice nucleation and precipitation events (IPCC, 2018). The identified gap of knowledge by both the IPCC and the WHO are converging, and it becomes clear that they are related to the physicochemical characteristics of particles. Air and water are in motion, as are the particles in air and water. We should be able to observe, track, characterize and remediate in-situ and real-time in 4D (3 dimensions and time). In this talk, we provide an overview of the recent advances in this lab to help to fill the gap identified by the IPCC and the WHO in the age of climate change and COVID-19. We discuss the development of novel promising technologies for fast in-situ and real-time observation of aerosols and waterborne viruses and physicochemical transformations and ice nucleation of anthropogenic emerging nanoparticles (e.g., nano-plastics in air/water). We explore some links between fundamental studies that provide advances in designing zero-net energy and recyclable technology using natural particles in air and soil to remove gaseous and particulate matter in the hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere.


BIO:


Professor Parisa Ariya is James McGill Chair in Chemistry, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. Her physical-analytic chemistry laboratories explore particles, bridging chemical, physical and biological-health processes in air, and interfaces with water/snow, soil, and building surfaces. This lab currently designs novel analytical chemistry technologies at McGill University to track individual single and clusters of particles, including airborne virus droplets and aerosols, without needing particle trapping in milliseconds. They also develop ultra-trace chemical detection capabilities and remote-sensed (AI) recyclable nano-sensors. This lab contributes to solving the pollution enigma by developing sustainable remediation-recycling methods and technologies for pollutants (gaseous and particles, including bioaerosols such as airborne viruses, and emerging contaminants) with zero-net energy. It allows understanding of feedback mechanisms between atmospheric, biogeochemical and microphysical processes. Dr. Ariya has published >150 internationally peer-reviewed publications, four patents, a book, and > 300 proceedings. She has presented >140 invited lectures on four continents. Several of her research contributions have been distinguished internationally. She has had the privilege of mentoring over 180 bright, highly qualified personnel in her laboratories who all follow their career of choice; many have become global leaders in academia (26 faculty members), governments, industries (4 CEO), or start-ups. Dr. Ariya has served in several leadership positions, e.g., the principal investigator of major grant applications, leading or acting as a member of grant agencies in Canada, the U.S., the EU, Asia and South America, notably serving as the chairperson of the Joint European Union Panel on Arctic Climate Change. She has served as an Editor and on the Editorial Boards of several international journals, including Analytical Chemistry (ACS), Cambridge Press and the Royal Society for Chemistry (U.K.). Dr. Ariya has also served as the chairperson of McGill’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. Professor Ariya has served as the lead author of two United Nations Environmental Protection (UN-EP) chapters on metal transformation in the environment. In addition, she has contributed to policy-related scientific reports on toxic contaminants, the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, the Clean Air Regulatory Agenda, an advisor to the House of Commons (CEPA revisions), Arctic assessment reports, and an advisor to Canadian Minamata convention delegates. Her numerous interviews have been distributed through major international mainstream and web-based media, from Spiegel and Washington times, translating science to the public and stakeholders.

LOCATION :  Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Friday 25 November 2022, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.
NEXT MEETINGS:

CMOS Tour Speaker, Dr. Robert Way, Thursday November 17, on Climate Services in Canada's North:  Are we doing enough?
Please click here for more details and to register.
Sabah Ibrahim, January 26, 2023, on climate agents
Dan Shan, February 23, 2023 on coastal/shelf dynamics


CMOS National Fall Tour Speaker - Robert Way
November 17, 2022

Title:  Climate Services in Canada's North:  Are We Doing Enough?

Recording
https://youtu.be/AsLV6he6gMs



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 20 October 2022
 

Speaker:  Dr Ward Smith,  Research Scientist, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada

Title:  How may a changing climate impact cropping systems in Canada?

Abstract:   Understanding how climate change impacts crop growth and soil health in Canada and identifying ways to manage these impacts is especially important since temperatures in Canada are increasing faster than the global average. Historically we’ve seen how a warming climate can provide certain benefits as the available seasonal crop heat units and frost-free periods have increased over long-term historical averages. However, in the future, some agricultural regions could be subject to higher incidences of extreme drought, increased crop heat stresses and excess water. In this presentation, we will review the state of models and modelling procedures for predicting the impacts of climate change on cropping systems. We will demonstrate how crops in Canada may respond to climate change and discuss the benefits of adaptation by changing crop types, rotations, and fertilizer strategies.  

BIO:  Dr. Ward Smith


Ward has 25 years’ experience leading research on identifying sustainable and resilient farm management practices in Canada. He integrates new research into agroecosystem models and investigates the interactions between climate, soils and agricultural management on crop growth, hydrology, GHG emissions, and soil carbon change. He uses these models to study ways to reduce adverse impacts of climate change on cropping systems and determines soils at risk in Canada. Ward chairs a World Meteorological Organization expert team on Agrometeorological Sciences and collaborates in international studies focused on improving and inter-comparing agricultural models and assessing the impacts of climate change on crop production. 

LOCATION Virtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday 20 October 2022, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

NEXT MEETINGS:

Friday 25 Nov 2022 - Parisa Ariya, McGill University Prof. on "Airborne Transmission of Viruses and COVID Management"
Prochain déjeuner-causerie virtuel / 29 septembre 2022

Speaker :  Peter Kimbell : Warning Preparedness Meteorologist, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Title :  The southern Ontario  derecho of May 21, 2022: an Environment and Climate Change Canada perspective.
 
Abstract :  Four years after the National Capital Region tornado outbreak of September 21, 2018, another summer convective storm affected southern Ontario (including the NCR), on May 21, 2022. This time, while the Northern Tornadoes Project did diagnose a few tornadoes, the storm’s primary manifestation was not tornadic. Rather, a linear convective system developed over southwestern Ontario, and maintained its linear characteristics throughout its trajectory across southeastern Ontario, the NCR, and into southern Quebec north of Montreal. Many people in Ontario and Quebec suddenly became familiar with the word “derecho,” which is Spanish for “straight ahead.” We will talk about derechos, including climatology, differences with tornadoes, and more.

BIO :   Peter Kimbell



Peter has been a meteorologist with Environment Canada for over 30 years. He began as an operational forecaster in Montreal and Toronto, and since then has worked as far east as Halifax and as far west as Thunder Bay. He has experience doing forecasting for marine and aviation clients, the military, and the general public. Since 2004 Peter has worked in a variety of non-forecasting positions, including policy advisor for international affairs, NAV CANADA Account Manager, A/Chief Aviation and Defence Services, A/Manager Performance Measurement, A/Manager Central Region Services, and A/Manager of the Ontario Storm Prediction Centre. Peter holds B. Sc. and M. Sc. degrees in meteorology from McGill University.

PLACE :  Virtual Presentation via Zoom


TIME : Thursday 29 September, 11 h 45 EDT


RSVP :  The meeting will be held on Zoom.  Please register here before the meeting.

Next Meetings :
 
Thursday 20 octobre 2022 - Ward Smith, Research Scientist, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada on How may a changing climate impact cropping systems in Canada?

Friday 25 novembre 2022 - Parisa Ariya,  McGill University Prof. on "Airborne Transmission of Viruses and COVID Management".

Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 21 April 2022

Speaker:  
Dr. Ellen Field, Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University

Title:  Role of Education in Climate Action: Research-Informed Engagement

Abstract:  

In this talk, Dr. Ellen Field will discuss how education is, and, has been an overlooked mitigation strategy and how education policy can be instrumental as part of a multi-pronged approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Gaps in current education policy at Canadian regional jurisdictions (provincial and territorial) and national levels will be discussed along with best practices of climate change education from empirical research studies. In addition, this talk will consider lessons the formal education system can learn from the youth climate justice movement, and possible pathways for responsive education systems that focus on transformative and transgressive pedagogies. Audience members will take away insights on how education is instrumental to climate action and suggested ways to engage various segments of the population in climate change education.

BIO:


Ellen Field is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education at Lakehead University. Her research is focused on policy and practice of climate change education in formal and higher education systems. Ellen teaches Environmental Education (B.Ed) and Climate Change Education (M.Ed) in the Faculty of Education, and has engaged hundreds of teachers in professional development workshops in the last several years. Ellen is an Associate Editor of the Canadian Journal of Environmental Education, co-chair of the Canadian Regional Hub of Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Change Education (MECCE), and moderates a professional learning community called Climate Change Education Canada with over 1000 teachers.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday, 21 April 2022, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line.

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.

NEXT MEETINGS

CMOS Congress - virtual from Saskatoon, 1-3 and 6-8 June 2022

Ottawa Centre - September 2022



CMOS Tour Speaker - 17 March 2022

Speaker :  Dr. Eric Oliver

Title: 
Bridging knowledge systems: Scientific and Inuit knowledge of the ocean and sea ice

BIO:

Dr. Eric Oliver is an Assistant Professor of Physical Oceanography in the Department of Oceanography, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. His research interests involve ocean and climate variability across a range of time and space scales including extreme events, the predictability of climate variations, the influence of modes of variability on the ocean, and the role of climate change on the mean state, variability and extremes of the climate system. He is of Inuit descent with roots in Nunatsiavut (northern Labrador) and is interested in Indigenous perspectives on climate, weather and oceans and understanding both Indigenous and scientific knowledge of these systems.

 

Abstract :   Science and Inuit both have ways of knowing with a rich understanding of climate, the ocean and sea ice. These understandings are distinct and independent, yet complementary. Is it possible to bridge these two knowledge systems so as to inform each from the other? Is it even desirable? As a Labrador Inuk working in the scientific field of oceanography I have spent the four years exploring these questions. While they cannot be answered simply, I will provide my perspective and experience working at the interface between scientific and Inuit knowledge of the ocean. My research team and collaborators in the Nunatsiavut Government and in Inuit communities in the region, have been undertaking a number of related project and activities along these lines. Inuit knowledge of the coastal ocean and sea ice is being documented using participatory mapping and interview methods. We are developing ways recording Inuit observations of the environment, rooted in and referencing local traditional knowledge and focusing on that which Inuit consider important and of value. Scientific measurements of coastal ocean temperature, salinity, and ocean currents are being made through community-based monitoring programmes with representation in most communities in Nunatsiavut who are providing their expertise in choosing locations, times, and methods of accessing field sites. Finally, we are developing numerical ocean models for the region with Inuit Knowledge providing both ground-truths against which we can validate the model as well as informing hypothesis and model experiments. We have also been exploring the role that land-based activities, including research workshops, can play in this process. We are encouraged by the points of contact between science and Inuit knowledge that have emerged – such as maps, conceptual models, hypotheses – and that these can play the role of boundary objects to facilitate dialogue between these two knowledge systems.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 17 February 2022

Speaker:  Elyn Humphreys, Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies at Carleton University

Title:  Methane emissions from the Hudson Bay Lowlands 

Abstract:  The Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) is the largest contiguous peatland complex in North America. Although peatlands are large stores of carbon, they are a natural source of methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. However, it remains uncertain how much CH4 is emitted by the HBL peatlands and how ongoing climate change will impact these emissions.

We measured CH4 fluxes using the eddy covariance technique at four HBL peatland sites with different vegetation and peat characteristics over several years. Total seasonal emissions ranged from 2.6 to 7.2 g CH4 m-2 (Apr 1 – Nov 30) with the highest values at the wettest and warmest peatland, a patterned fen, and the lowest at the driest and coolest peatland, a raised peat plateau with permafrost. Year-to-year variability in CH4 emissions was less than site-to-site variability.  These measurements can help constrain recent top-down estimates of HBL-wide CH4 budgets.  We also discuss how these measurements can help us understand the potential impacts of warming, drying and thaw on HBL CH4 emissions.

BIO:
 

Elyn Humphreys is a Professor in the Department of Geography & Environmental Studies at Carleton University.  She leads the CUBiomet research group focused on measuring and modeling surface-atmosphere interactions of northern terrestrial ecosystems. Her group aims to improve our understanding of the impacts climate change and other disturbances have on the energy and carbon budgets of these ecosystems and their role in feedback processes within the climate system.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday, 17 February 2022, 11:45 AM, EST

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings

NEXT MEETINGS

Thursday 17 March 2022 - Eric Oliver Experiences bridging knowledge systems (ocean science and Inuit Knowledge) in coastal Nunatsiavut. (NB. talk to be hosted jointly by the Ottawa and Halifax Centres)

Thursday 21 April 2022 - Ellen Field Role of Education in Climate Action: Research-informed engagement
.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 20 January 2022
 

Speakers:  Trevor Andersen and Astrid Schetselaar

Titles:

Trevor Andersen:  Synoptic conditions leading to storm force winds in Hurricane Alley, km 450-465, Dempster Highway, Yukon

Astrid Schetselaar:  Increases in maintenance costs for highways due to climate change in Yukon

Abstracts: 

Trevor Andersen
The final 15 kilometres of the Dempster Highway within the Yukon (YT km 450-465) – known as Hurricane Alley – experience strong downslope winter windstorms. Easterly winds blow perpendicularly across the highway after topographic enhancement by a north-south ridge east of the road. The ECCC Rock River meteorological station recorded 88 hours of sustained wind speeds above 75 km/h during winter 2020/21. The windstorms frequently cause road closures and hazardous conditions for motorists. ECCC wind forecasts are often inaccurate since the modelled grid cells are much larger than the ridge; however, recent UBC modelling suggested that using smaller grid cells should increase accuracy. In October 2021, seven additional local meteorological stations were installed to measure winds. This talk will discuss the state of the research on Hurricane Alley windstorms, and the use of synoptic tools (ECCC analysis charts and NOAA HYSPLIT model results) to explain atmospheric conditions responsible for the windstorms.

Astrid Schletselaar:  Climate warming is causing rapid and widespread environmental change in northern regions. Transportation networks in Canada’s North are becoming increasingly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. Rising ground temperatures and permafrost thaw have been a main cause of road damage as the bearing capacity of the ground is significantly reduced and subsequently subsides, leading to differential settlement of the road surface. Other road damage is due to increased precipitation which causes road washouts, icings, damage of culverts and landslides. Under current climate trends, it is expected that highway infrastructure in northern communities will require increased maintenance, incurring significant costs, in order to meet functional standards.

This presentation will outline a quantified assessment of climate change-induced maintenance expenditures for highways in Yukon. Changes in expenditures linked to climate conditions will be discussed in relation to underlying permafrost and ground ice conditions.

BIOs:

Trevor Andersen grew up in Ottawa ON and completed his B.Sc. in Physical Geography at Carleton University in April of 2020. He is currently completing his M.Sc. in Geography at Carleton University under the supervision of Dr. Chris Burn and Dr. Ian McKendry (UBC). His interest in meteorology originated from experiencing Hurricane Charley while on vacation in Florida during August 2004. Trevor’s introduction to the windstorms of Hurricane Alley occurred while assisting another Masters student with her research there.



Astrid Schetselaar
is a M.Sc. candidate in Geography at Carleton University, under the supervision of Dr. Chris Burn. Her research interests include the effects of climate change on northern transportation systems in permafrost regions and the consequent social, economic, and cultural outcomes of these effects. As well, her interests are in translating scientific investigations of the impacts of climate change to policy for the development of sustainable and resilient infrastructure. Previously, Astrid completed a B.Sc. in environmental science at the University of Ottawa with a specialization in global change.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME:  Thursday, 20 January 2022, 11:45 AM, EST

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 18 November 2021
 

Speaker:  Stephan Gruber, Professor, Carleton University

Title:  Toward Permafrost Climate Services 

Abstract:  The Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate (SROCC) revealed the benefits of ambitious mitigation and effective adaptation and, conversely, the escalating costs and risks of delayed action. But how do we best enable this effective adaptation and ambitious mitigation when it comes to permafrost thaw? In this presentation, I will explore the potential role of operational services. With the framing of climate services, several distinct challenges can be identified for permafrost climate services: (1) history – climate services evolved from e.g., National Weather Services, whereas permafrost services are rarely established, (2) perception – permafrost areas are in the periphery and hazards affect relatively few people directly, and (3) processes and paradigms – a new combination of research and capabilities related to the atmosphere and the subsurface are needed to generate future scenarios of permafrost thaw. Emerging permafrost climate services and initiatives will be discussed to illustrate the growing momentum that exists in Canada, for example NSERC PermafrostNet, and globally.

BIO:  Stephan Gruber


Stephan is a Professor at Carleton University and the Canada Research Chair in Climate Change Impacts/Adaptation in Northern Canada. Previously, he worked at the University of Zurich (Switzerland) and the Université de Savoie (France). His education is in Physical Geography (Germany, Switzerland), Environmental Systems Analysis and Monitoring (the Netherlands), and Arctic Studies (Finland). Stephan's research program quantifies permafrost thaw in Arctic and high-mountain environments.

· PermafrostNet (NSERC Permafrost Partnership Network for Canada), scientific director, since 2019
· IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate, lead author and member of drafting team for the Summary for Policymakers, 2017–2019
· Hindu Kush Himalayan Monitoring and Assessment Program, lead author, 2016–2018
· Co-editor-in-chief of The Cryosphere, 2010–2017
· Contributor to Swiss Permafrost Monitoring Network PERMOS, 2004–2013

NEXT MEETINGS


Thursday 20 January 2022 - Trevor Andersen and Astrid Schetselaar

- Trevor Andersen: Storm force winds in Hurricane Alley, KM 450-465, Dempster Highway, Yukon

- Astrid Schetselaar: Increases in maintenance costs for highways due to climate change in Yukon

Thursday 17 February 2022 - Dr. Elyn Humphreys  Peatland / tundra methane flux studies

Thursday 17 March 2022 - Eric Oliver Experiences bridging knowledge systems (ocean science and Inuit Knowledge) in coastal Nunatsiavut. (NB. talk to be hosted jointly by the Ottawa and Halifax Centres)

Thursday 21 April 2022 - Ellen Field Role of Education in Climate Action: Research-informed engagement



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 21 October 2021
 

Speakers:  Dr. Alan Betts, Atmospheric Research, Pittsford, Vermont 

Title:  Climate Change and Society

Abstract:  This talk will be based upon this recent paper which I suggest you scan.

"Climate Change and Society" DOI: 10.3934/geosci. 2021012 

This examines our understanding of climate change, as well as the reluctance of industrial societies to deal with the drivers, especially the burning of the fossil fuels, before the consequences become catastrophic.  I have worked as a professional scientist for 50 years, but I also realized 50 years ago that science alone is not enough to deal with pressing global issues, as it lacks a moral framework—it lacks wisdom.  So I decided it was also my responsibility as a scientist to develop the skills to map out what drives the social framework and the social assumptions.  I contrast the Earth-centered indigenous worldview needed for our survival (which has been systematically destroyed), with the industrial capitalist mindset of the Fossil fuel Empire that is destroying our stable climate to maximize profits.  We review briefly the long history of the misuse of human power, and the rise of science and technology without a guiding moral framework.  But the deceit and bribery of politicians by the Fossil Empire are no match for the Earth system response. We are seeing new climate extremes on a global scale that are destroying our fossil fuel and economic infrastructure in an attempt to save some of the Earth’s ecosystem.

BIO:  



Dr. Alan Betts of Atmospheric Research in Pittsford, Vermont is a climate scientist, who has worked on climate change planning for Vermont. He is a Weekly Planet columnist for the Rutland Herald and Barre-Montpelier Times-Argus, and before COVID he was a frequent speaker on climate change issues around the state. You can hear and see his radio and TV appearances on his web-site: https://alanbetts.com/talks

He is a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the Royal Meteorological Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a past-president of the Vermont Academy of Science and Engineering (VASE). He has authored more than 175 reviewed papers in the scientific literature. He was the AMS Robert E. Horton Lecturer in Hydrology in 2004; and the AMS Jule Charney Award winner in 2007. In 2016, Alan Betts was the first recipient of the Bert Bolin Global Environmental Change Award from the American Geophysical Union.

Atmospheric Research was established in Vermont in 1979. Its mission is to understand the Earth’s weather and climate, to develop improved earth system models and to help society understand the existential challenge of global climate change.

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME21 October 2021, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.

NEXT MEETING: Thursday November 18th, speaker Dr. Stephan Gruber on Permafrost Climate Services as a way to frame the research in NSERC PermafrostNet



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / 23 September 2021
 

Speakers:  Barbara Delisle and Peter Kimbell from Meteorological Service of Canada

Title:  Canadian Weather Radar - Public Display Update and Plans for Upgrading Franktown Site

Abstract:  In 2017, the Government of Canada announced the replacement of its weather radar network. At the time, the network consisted of 31 radars, including two operated in partnership with the Department of National Defence and one owned by McGill University. A contract was awarded to buy and install 32 to 33 new radars. They are S-band (10 cm) radars, and utilize dual-polarization technology. One of the radars is located in Franktown, in eastern Ontario, and was just commissioned (August 2021). The presentation will provide an overview of the network, the new technology, and the resulting improvement in our ability to forecast the weather in eastern Ontario.  The website www.weather.gc.ca  is getting a makeover that will allow you to view more weather products and services. You probably noticed on March 29 that the RADAR product changed on your favorite weather website! This was a first step towards transforming the site, which now offers products and services geo-referenced on a single map of Canada. As with every transformation, a lot of reactions and adjustments were necessary. We will be happy to provide you with an overview of the changes and improvements available now and in the future. 

BIOs:

BARBARA DELISLE

Senior Manager, Dissemination Systems, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Federal public servant for 20 years, Barbara Delisle has acquired a diversified experience in the management of programs and services, in particular as the manager responsible for human resources compliance at the Communications Security Establishment, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, and the Office of the Languages Commissioner. She then developed an information management and automated planning system for 26 research units at Employment and Social Development Canada, before joining the Benefits Directorate at the Treasury Board Secretariat, where she orchestrated the overhaul of business and project management processes. Barbara joined the Meteorological Service of Canada in March 2014. With her team of experts and technicians, she leads the way in maintaining operations on our broadcasting platforms and hardware and software transformations to improve and extend our services to the population. Through various internal and external partnerships with the organization, programmers, scientists and service agents, she made possible the transformation of voice systems, various website transitions and improvements to the mobile application. A change agent and vision maker, she proudly shares advancements in MSC IT service delivery.

****

PETER KIMBELL

Warning Preparedness Meteorologist, Meteorological Service of Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Peter has been a meteorologist with Environment Canada for over 30 years. He began as an operational forecaster in Montreal and Toronto, and since then has worked as far east as Halifax and as far west as Thunder Bay. He has experience doing forecasting for marine and aviation clients, the military, and the general public. Since 2004 Peter has worked in a variety of non-forecasting positions, including policy advisor for international affairs, NAV CANADA Account Manager, A/Chief Aviation and Defence Services, A/Manager Performance Measurement, A/Manager Central Region Services, and A/Manager of the Ontario Storm Prediction Centre. His substantive position (and the one he likes most) is that of Warning Preparedness Meteorologist for eastern Ontario. Peter holds B. Sc. and M. Sc. degrees in meteorology from McGill University. 

LOCATIONVirtual presentation via Zoom.

TIME23 September 2021, 11:45 AM, EDT

RSVP:  Meeting will take place on Zoom. Please register in advance for this meeting. If you have registered and lost your Zoom credentials, search your inbox or already-read mail for this exact phrase: CMOS Ottawa Centre Luncheon Meeting in the subject line. 

PAST MEETINGS Click here for CMOS YouTube Channel containing recordings from most past virtual meetings.

NEXT MEETING:  Thursday October 21, speaker Dr. Alan Betts, on "Science and Society Challenges".



Upcoming CMOS Ottawa Centre Virtual Lunch Meeting / Thursday 29 April 2021
 
Speaker:   Laura Twidle, Managing Director, Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. (CatIQ)

Title:  The Impacts of Extreme Events on the Canadian Insurance Industry  

Abstract:  While a global pandemic paused many aspects of our lives in 2020, extreme weather events gave us no reprieve. Natural and man-made disasters, known as “catastrophes,” in the insurance industry, broke global records around the world last year, and Canada was no exception. Insured losses in Canada from catastrophic events in 2020 were nearly CAN $2.4 billion, continuing the past decade’s trend of increasing annual losses.

Identifying and preparing for the concerns of the more frequent, more severe extreme weather events anticipated by climate change is key to reducing impacts on Canadians. Insured loss data in combination with climate data and mitigation techniques can provide decision makers with the necessary information to act.

This presentation will provide an analysis of the meteorological factors at work in natural catastrophes and the geographical distribution of Canada’s NatCATs, with emphasis on 2020, using data collected by CatIQ, Canada’s insured loss and exposure indices provider. Analysis will include a close look at 2020 insured loss data and how it compares to the Canadian catastrophe loss database.

BIO:  Laura Twidle